Little Berry, Big Impact

Little Berry, Big Impact

Conservation of Polar Bears in Canada

Conservation of Polar Bears in Canada

Forests

Forests

Ebola virus disease

Ebola virus disease

Women in Science and Engineering

Women in Science and Engineering

Arctic Survey Expedition

Arctic Survey Expedition

What's New

  • Finding omega oil on the forest floor
    November 25, 2014 - A public and private partnership is looking for a sustainable, unique alternative in plant-based omega oils
  • From air to space to operator–RIFL2E technology demonstrates high speed satellite communications and advanced information management for airborne surveillance
    November 17, 2014 - Modern imaging and search sensors have a big data problem. They produce more information than can be practically transmitted and analyzed for the development of actionable intelligence. Pilots often have to fly within range of a traditional line-of-sight data link to transfer their surveillance data.
  • Canada's SCISAT Satellite makes important discovery for understanding the evolution of the ozone layer
    November 6, 2014 - Thanks to Canada's SCISAT, an international team of scientists has discovered a recent and unexpected increase in stratospheric hydrogen chloride (HCl) in the Northern Hemisphere. Information from SCISAT along with other satellite data and ground-based measurements showed the scientific team that the increase in stratospheric HCl is due to a slowdown in the atmospheric circulation of the Northern Hemisphere. This discovery could impact how scientists will analyze the evolution of the stratospheric ozone layer going forward.
  • Retweet, like, or share: How social media is changing the face of emergency management
    November 3, 2014 - It’s no longer unusual to learn about a severe weather warning or police manhunt through a “tweet” or a “wall post”. These words refer to common practices on Twitter and Facebook, but were not part of our vocabulary a decade ago. Today, whether it is for personal or professional reasons, the majority of Canadians are engaging with one another through social media websites every day.
  • Celebrating 75 years of human sciences research
    October 29, 2014 – A CF-18 pilot completes a difficult manoeuvre that could cause blackout, but is protected by the G-suit and training to counter the effects of the G-forces. A diver completing a successful mission avoids the bends upon return to the surface. A search and rescue technician calculates the likelihood of locating a missing person using the Cold Exposure Survival Model (CESM). A Canadian Armed Forces physician evaluates health risks and physical accommodation of an aircrew applicant. These all have one thing in common: benefiting from the results of human sciences in support of defence and security.
  • NRC and AvidBiologics progress new treatments to seek and destroy cancer cells
    October 28, 2014 - Canadian company AvidBiologics Inc. and the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) are collaborating on one of the most promising advances in the fight against cancer: antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). Recently signed research and licensing agreements will enable both organizations to continue developing a series of ADCs targeting breast, lung, and head-and-neck cancers. Unlike chemotherapy, ADCs specifically seek and destroy cancer cells, with minimal impact on healthy cells.
  • Minister of State Holder Delivers Address on Innovation to Canadian Universities
    October 27, 2014 - Federal science minister outlines Canadian approach to innovation success—people, knowledge, partnerships
  • Harper Government Introduces Legislation to Strengthen Canada's Arctic Research Potential
    October 23, 2014 - Today in the House of Commons, the Government of Canada introduced the Canadian High Arctic Research Station Act to establish the governance structure for a new, world-class science and technology research facility.
  • National Science and Technology Week: The people behind the science of defence
    October 21, 2014 - Many sectors working together ensure that Canada has the science and technology it needs to defend and secure our country. That said, if you're looking for a scientist, an aerospace engineer, a doctor or other defence-related professions, you just might find them all working together at Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC). You may also be surprised that many of our PhDs are not medical doctors, yet still contribute to saving lives.
  • Expert Panel cautions an increasingly complex energy environment will test the resiliency of Canadian businesses in the future
    October 16, 2014 - A new expert panel report, Energy Prices and Business Decision-Making in Canada: Preparing for the Energy Future, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies, details how Canadian businesses have historically been successful in responding to fluctuating energy prices, but this should not be considered a predictor for future resiliency or competiveness. The energy environment is evolving with advances in oil and gas extraction, the development of alternative energy sources, changes within the electricity market, and new regulatory requirements. Understanding the implications of this complex energy environment and global pressures are critical for future business resilience and success.
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Canada's north is a vast area. The three territories alone, Nunavut, Yukon and Northwest Territories, encompass approximately 40% of the total area of Canada.
- Natural Resources Canada